How Chevrolet Will Sell The Diesel Cruze In The U.S.


Diesel has a very interesting reputation in the U.S. market. For trucks, buses, work vans, pick up trucks, and other equipment, it’s the obvious choice just as it is anywhere else in the world. For the passenger car however? Not so much. That is in part due to the American car buying public having the stereotypes of old diesels firmly ingrained in their minds; it’s going to be smokey, smelly, rough, and hard to maintain, plus you have to fill up a truck stops.

Not anymore however. Owe it to a combination of steadily rising and/or volatile fuel prices, and the willingness to try something new, Americans have slowly come to embrace diesels through the only company brave enough to seriously push them, Volkswagen and it’s sibling Audi. Their TDI models have become a steadily growing success. Recent reports have shown that diesel sales in the U.S. for the first time have beaten hybrids, and have spiked on top of that.

Perhaps America is finally starting to realize what Europe found out about diesels eons decades ago. After all, it is pretty hard to argue against stump pulling torque, clean emissions, fuel efficiency figures that would make a Prius blush, and the fact that for the hybrid averse out there, a diesel is still a normal car, with a proper combustion engine, it just doesn’t have spark plugs.

Chevy wants in. On all of the aforementioned. And they are well aware that although diesel is catching on, the stereotypes persist in their home market. So how will they market the Chevy Cruze diesel? Bluntly. The marketing goes as follows; “diesels are not dirty, diesels do not run rough, diesels are not loud, diesels start perfectly in cold weather, diesels fuel is not hard to find.” Chevy has sold over 33,000 diesel Cruze’s worldwide already, and over 1 million other diesel vehicles on top of that, so they know what they’re talking about.

I hope it works. Although somehow I have a feeling it most certainly will.

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